Monday Morning Meeting

Welcome to another edition of The Monday Morning Meeting.

If you've ever wondered why we spend so much meeting time on trivial things while avoidin the "big" issues, perhaps Parkinson's Law of Triviality explains why:

At work, you’re expected to have intelligent opinions and propose smart solutions to problems. But, when you’re working on something that is very complex, it’s intimidating and exhausting to have opinions on the biggest challenges. It’s so easy to focus your attention on the issues that are easy to grok and which won’t (literally) blow up in your face if you’re wrong. So, it’s understandable that people schedule meetings about the roof of the bike shed so that they can voice their opinions and feel useful and heard.

One Quick Tip:

When working with a team to redesign a process or service, don't ask them what's broken and needs to be fixed. Instead, ask what "annoys" them. It gets people to identify things they might miss. If you want to uncover more annoyances, ask them to keep a journal for a few days.

Five Links:

1. Wouldn't it be great if there was an hour for focus at the beginning of the work day before the parade of meetings begins?

2. Want to justify a meeting-free morning, read this and think like a chef.

3. The philosopher Pascal figured out how to get others to adopt your ideas: let them think they're modifications of their own.

4. "There's often a big gap between changing the world and convincing people you've changed the world."

5. The "Five Why's" are a wonderful way to get to the root cause of many things. Here's how Jeff Bezos uses them.